Top 10 Ways to Reduce Inflammation

phyto • listic

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  • phy·to·nu·tri·ent [fīt-ō-nü-trē-nt]
  • n. A substance derived from plants
  • that is beneficial to health.
  • ho·lis·tic [ho-lis´tik]
  • n. Pertaining to interconnected parts, explicable only by reference to the whole.

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⛓ SPINE SPRAIN ⛓ Just like we can sprain ligaments in our ankle or knee, the many ligaments that support our spine can become sprained as well. This is less likely to happen when our muscles are trained to optimally support us but once we’ve strained our muscles, the next line of defense is our ligaments. And once damaged they take a long time to heal and/or may never fully heal. Here again, training the muscles to take over stabilization is paramount. The other consideration is that there’s not really a test for ligamentous spinal sprain so really it’s the same work anyway: Train, re-train, rehab, re-strengthen, rebuild. We’ve got to do the support work - before , during and after. . . #retrainbackpain #lowbackpain #backpain #backpainrelief #backpainsucks #backpainexercises Thanks again to Dr. Joe Muscolino for the original post & image . . #Repost @drjoemuscolino with ・・・ Intertransverse Ligaments of the spine. 🎈 . . Manual therapists and movement professionals often focus so much on muscles and their associated fascia that they neglect paying attention to ligaments, so I thought I would share this drawn illustration of the intertransverse ligaments of the spine. 😊😊 . . This is a posterior view of two vertebrae. 🎈 . The superior vertebra is laterally flexing (side-bending) to the right. 🎈 . We see that the right-sided ligament has slackened but the left-sided ligament is pulled taut, resisting any further right lateral flexion. 🎈 . . Ligaments work at “end range” of motion. Until they are pulled taut at the end of a range of motion, they do not do anything. But at end range, they stop/resist further movement. 🎈 . . Application? ... When a client’s back “goes out” during a movement, if the injury occurs somewhere within the range of motion, it is probably a muscular strain. But if the injury occurs at the end of the range of motion, it is likely a ligamentous sprain! 🎈🎈 . . Digital COMT, my continuing education video streaming subscription service for manual therapists and movement professionals has an entire folder on pathomechanics of injury, as well as more than 1,000 other video lessons! 👍 . And I add seven new video lessons each and every

🔮 DECONGEST🔮 One thing we probably all have in common is excess tension in our Pecs and anterior shoulder area. This compromises our nervous system and negatively affects our breathing. It may be exacerbated by allergies, posture, the way you sleep, exercise and/or how you work on your computer, hold your phone, or carry your kid. Check out this simple Chest Decongest sequence from @tuneupfitness to relieve muscle soreness and restore breathing. [balls can be purchased from the link in my bio] . . #Repost @tuneupfitness ・・・ All you KNEAD for deep relief is a wall and a ball. Target the subclavius and track your way to the pec minor with the Chest Decongest Sequence. 1. Gutter the ball beneath your clavicle to the soft tissue triangle that includes your subclavius, pec major, and pec minor. 2. Apply deep pressure by leaning into the wall as you rock the ball from side to side. 3. Elevate and depress the shoulder to expose the soft tissues underneath while you continue to track the ball from side to side. 4. Explore different directions of motion by locking the ball in space as you move the arm overhead, behind your back, and anywhere else that it feels good.

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